Gibberish

theory is that the word comes from the name of the famous 8th-century Islamic alchemist Jābir ibn Hayyān, whose name was Latinized as “Geber”, thus the term “gibberish” arose as a reference to the incomprehensible technical jargon often used by Jabir and other alchemists who followed.

Gibberish Meditation

Most people think that meditation is something that needs to done or practiced. Actually, meditation involves doing nothing and resting peacefully. Most of us are busy day and night running after material objects. Not many people devote their time to discovering their true inner self.

Contentment is Here

One need not renounce work and family and retire to the mountain caves to get inner peace. Contentment can be obtained where you are, as it is present in your heart. Meditation is often considered difficult, especially techniques involving concentration. In this article, we present an easy and joyful meditation technique called Gibberish.

Origin of Gibberish Meditation

This technique was evolved by a Christian mystic named Gabar. He had a unique way of answering people’s queries about enlightenment. Gabar would simply make nonsensical sounds. Initially, people wrote him off as crazy. But eventually, Gabar ended up with many followers.

Gabar’s Technique

Gabar would just speak nonsense. He uttered endless sounds that were not inter-connected at all. There were no periods, commas or sentence structure. Gabar enjoyed himself immensely, laughing all the while. Slowly, his followers started to understand the method behind the madness. As they listened to Gabar’s gibberish, their minds started to become silent. The mystic made his followers reach deep into their inner self, where they could find all the answers.

The Monkey Mind

The human mind has been rightly called the monkey mind. It keeps on chattering endlessly during our waking hours, and in sleep too, in the form of dreams. We need to realize how neurotic our mind is. It can become our worst enemy if we become its slave and try fulfill every whim and fancy. So, it is important to still the mind and control the constant mental chatter.

How to Practice Gibberish Meditation

You can practice this technique alone or with others. Just look at the sky or a natural object for a few minutes. Now, start singing and forget everything. Do not sing meaningful songs. Simply pour out all the gibberish in your mind. You can continue for about twenty minutes.

Benefits of Gibberish Meditation

Gibberish gets rid of our mind’s accumulated craziness. The mind needs words to think. Don’t suppress your thoughts, but cast them out using gibberish. As your mind unburdens, it will become less heavy and more clear. After the twenty minutes of gibberish meditation, quietly lie down and be silent. The mind’s chatter would have reduced and you can experience deep inner silence. So, use gibberish and release all your emotional and mental pressures.

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Tratak: Concentrate to Transcend

Our mind is always occupied with the incessant flow of thoughts. It is always in a state of disturbance, and has a habitual tendency for distraction. This leaves us feeling so much fragmented that we find ourselves scattered in all directions. It is no exaggeration then, to say that our mind cannot stay still for longer than a few moments, which eventually results in lack of concentration and loss of memory. We are unable to grasp and focus in the present moment.

Now, how do we enhance our power of concentration and strengthen our memory? A unique meditation technique called Tratak is an answer to this. It has many benefits.

Tratak not only brings an end to the mind’s distractions but also enhances the ability to concentrate. It increases the power of memory and brings the mind in a state of awareness, attention and focus.

Tratak is an ideal meditation technique for people of all age groups, especially for students who need to concentrate on studies. Older people who often tend to forget every now and then can greatly benefit from this technique.

As a result of its continuous practice, you will witness an immense rise in your confidence level, stability in your thoughts, and an ability to focus on whatever task you undertake.

Method
Light a candle (or diya) in your meditation room or wherever you are comfortable, three to four feet in front of you. Sit in front of it. Remember, the flame should be at the level of your eyes so that you can see straight at it without being uncomfortable.

Posture
This is the most essential part of any meditation technique. Keep your spine erect so that inner energy can flow easily through the subtle channels of the body and render tranquility to the restless mind.
Sit with your legs crossed or in Padmasana. Sit gracefully, with poise.

Determination
You can derive maximum benefit from this meditation technique only when you are determined to practice it. Keep your gaze fixed at the flame without being distracted with the outer disturbances or thoughts.
Never give up! And do not move your body while you meditate.

Stage 1
This powerful technique of meditation is based on fixing one’s gaze at the flame of a candle or diya. The flame should burn steadily and it will do so only when we calm the air around it.

Begin with slow and deep breathing. As you inhale, let the stomach expand, and breathe out with complete contraction. While you breathe in this manner, keep a steady gaze at the flame.

Keep your eyes focused. Gaze at the flame, not the wick or the candle or the diya; just the flame. Let your vision be at the flame. If thoughts arise, simply ignore them; do not struggle to remove them. It is important to be wakeful and vigilant.

Stage 2
Imagine the flame is entering your body through your eyes and illuminating your inner being. At this stage, it is good to let the eyes close with ease. Now, try to imagine the same flame with closed eyes as you were seeing it with open eyes. If you are able to practice tratak without blinking your eye, it will be easy for you to see the flame with closed eyes.

If you are not yet able to experience the spreading illumination of the flame, open your eyes again, do tratak (fix your gaze at the burning flame), and then shut them. Gradually you will find that your gaze has grown more peaceful and tranquil.

Once you are established within, watch yourself separate from this body, and be distant from your mind. This distance will eliminate the clutter from the mind and make it silent, peaceful, and tranquil.

Tratak is a guided meditation technique which can help you improve your concentration, memory and intelligence. Studies have shown that Tratak meditation can significantly benefit in the following ways:

  • Increases concentration, memory, and mental power.
  • Develops the confidence, intelligence, and patience.
  • Increases work efficiency.
  • Improves motivational power and foresight.
  • Strengthens the will power and decision making ability.
  • Helps in getting rid of many mental, emotional, and physical ailments and diseases.
  • Reduces stress and tension.
  • Leads to Healthy and Balanced living.

It is only when we learn to meditate that we learn to live life meaningfully. Meditation is an experience in itself which enhances the quality of life and helps one discover the exuberant inner bliss.

With mounting pressures and endless pursuit to achieve lofty ambitions, we go on running tirelessly. Amidst all this chaos, take a deep breath and explore the benefits of Tratak meditation, an ideal meditation technique for people of all age groups.

It is highly recommended for students and working professionals for greater efficiency.

Tratak with Sublime Music

In order to facilitate the seeker, the meditation technique, Tratak -A Divine Gaze is available in the form of Audio CD and Audio Cassette. Designed and developed by Anandmurti Gurumaa, this technique is highly apt for students, professionals, and anyone with short memory.

When to practice?

This technique is best done during the early hours of the morning, or in the night when it is natural dark. The idea is to let the flame of candle/diya eliminate the darkness of ignorance which is rooted deep in the mind. If you are doing it during daytime then practice it in a dark room.

5 Reasons why Running is as good as Meditation

I consider, running to be as powerful as meditation, I would say it is the best form of active Zen meditation.

1. All Running needs is our body and some determination

 All that we need for running, is a completely operational body (all limbs intact) and some initial determination to counter any inertia or laziness. A treadmill is not necessary, nor is a professional running track.

Although running outdoors has its own advantages, we can even run on one spot, inside our house, without having to wear any running shoes or gear.

2. Running improves circulation, improves health and improves mental health

Running utilizes 16 different muscles of the body, classified under 3 types of muscles (primary, supporting and auxiliary). It is a powerful exercise to boost blood circulation to the body and to the brain. The Cerebral Blood Flow constitutes 15% of the blood flow to the entire body.

Our blood carries all the nutrition in an assimilable to each cell of our body. Our skin, organs, muscles, cartilages, bones, tissues, membranes, nerves, and tendons, are made up of cells. When these cells are nourished, our body is nourished. Toxins and free-radicals are duly flushed out. The body is healthy. A healthy body is free from distractions. The mind within the healthy body is less distracted and more focused. A mind focused on a singular objective is a mind in meditation.

3. When Running the focus automatically shifts on breathing

It is noticed that when we run regularly, our breathing becomes regulated and deeper, our concentration shifts towards breathing and fills the lungs to their designated capacity. In spiritual practices, regulation of breath is a precondition to further advancement. Is it not meditation then, to have the mind and body together watching the inflow and outflow of breath? Inhaling through the nose twice and exhaling through the mouth twice in the same like letting out steam, helps establish a rhythmic pattern while running. This pattern helps build repetition and establish a mantra like effect on the mind.

4. Running exercises both the left and right brain

The human brain is divided into two distinct cerebral hemispheres. Due to contralateral (criss-cross) wiring of nerves, the right hemisphere of the brain, controls the muscles in the left side of our body and the left hemisphere of the brain controls the muscles in the right side of our body. Running is among a few other exercises which coordinate both the right and left major limbs and muscles of the body, thus employing both hemispheres equally, for a prolonged duration. This is just the physiological advantage. The esoteric advantage is that, the Ida and Pingala naadis (energy meridians), start clearing and get equal attention, thus facilitating a faster spiritual growth.

5. Running elevates Serotonin and Dopamine activities in the brain

Serotonin, also known as 5-hydroxytryptamine is a hormone in the pineal gland, the digestive tract, the central nervous system, and blood platelets. A hormone is a substance our body produces that regulates and controls the activity of certain cells or organs.

Dopamine in the brain,  functions as a neurotransmitter—a chemical released by nerve cells to send signals to other nerve cells. The brain includes several distinct dopamine systems, one of which plays a major role in reward-motivated behavior.

Some sources say that prince Gautama, after he renounced all worldly possessions, he went on to meditate beneath a tree. For his daily meal he had a bowl of freshly condensed milk and rice for seven consecutive days. On the seventh day the consumption of pure milk induced high levels of serotonin and dopamine in his brain. This catapulted him instantly in a very deep state of trance, following which he attained enlightenment, becoming the Buddha!

Unfortunately, we live in a world where we can neither vouch for the purity of the milk nor the rice. We do not often practice strict penances, limiting our meals to rice and milk only.

Irrespective of whether we want our lives to model the Buddha’s or not, when we run, we elevate the serotonin and dopamine levels in our brain, promoting healthier brain and body activity. In the esoteric sense, the brain of a person in a meditative trance is shown to have maintained optimal levels of serotonin and dopamine.

There are other exercises that are equally good, but they require additional accessories (skipping), or need a certain space and facility (swimming), or place a heavy premium on body nutrients and hormones (sex).

How much should we run?

It is always safe to exercise within our physical capacities. Studies reveal that running for 30-40 minutes at a pace of 4-5 kmph, 3-4 times a day promotes optimal health.

Why run and not walk?

A walk if brisk or fast is permissive, however, running is a more engaging for the mind and body, because of the kines-thesis and dynamism involved.

The Sound of One Hand Clapping

The Zen koan of the sound of one hand clap, by Hakuin Ekaku is very simple to understand. In fact it is so integral to our existence that it has been there all along, but we have never bothered to really listen.

Ofcourse it is something to be experienced, and one cannot be articulate enough to describe it in its entirety, and all that. Let us assume that we all know how to clap and we all more or less can relate to the sound of two hands clapping.

Let us come back to it later. Now, haven’t we all been deeply involved in listening to a song that we like.So deeply involved that we could not possibly think of the world, not even ourselves?

Now what if I got as deeply engrossed as that, say, when I am listening to the sound of my teeth chewing food, or water falling on my head during a bath, or my fingers touching the keyboard while I type this post, or the listening to the sound of my breath leave my nostrils. What if I was deeply engrossed every time I sense using my eyes, hands, ears, mouth and nose, so much so that I suddenly realize, that these are not really five different senses, its just one sense. A deeper faculty of observation that employs the bodies organs to feel or sense.

What if I suddenly realize, that it is my nature to observe. Further, when I am deeply engrossed in the observation there is nothing else but the observation. When I am listening to the music, there is only the music. There is no me. I am also the music. The listener and the listened are one. The observer and the observed are one. There are no two hands, there is just one hand.

In effect, when the hands are folded and palms touch each other, without making a sound, it is also a prayer. The highest form of prayer is absolute silence. Silence of thoughts.

 

Every body knows it …

” It lies beyond the extremities of repetition”

It is there in me. Living itself out. It has built you and it has built me. It shows as if everything not me, is you. Why has it done that? It got bored of the stillness and it wanted to play. How can it resist seeing itself play? It becomes me. What is it playing with? It becomes you. What is the play? You and Me, Me and you.
Repetition, choiceless-ness, realization, enlightenment are complex synonyms of the play. The antonym is it.