Karma Dharma Moksha

Being able to do, what we want to do, when we want to do it, without, hurting others and ourselves in the process is Moksha. There is no buddhist, islamic, hindu, or any other world religion that tells us otherwise. Doing what we do to the best of our abilities is karma, it is also dharma. The side effect is Moksha. Moksha is not a destination. There is no destination. That’s the beauty of it all. When we know there is nowhere to go, does it matter if we have little or more time. There is just action to be done.

Gods aren’t liberated beings, they need to take a corporeal form to get liberated. Gods are alpha, beta, delta, gamma, omega beings that yearn to be born in a human form. So that they can liberate themselves to join the Overmind. Gods like to do karma and reinstate such karma as dharma to get Moksha. Manifestations to perform various karmas, to get to Moksha happen in an event based space called the Universe. Ths is Karma kshetra, it is the dharmakshetra and is the kurukshetra.

Do not follow a buddha, or become a buddha, do not let ideas, incept ideas in you, that is not you. If you have a idea first within you, and then you see that someone has put it in good words, you can point to that, but thats that. Forget that idea, let it pass. Do not hold on to it.

 

Triphala: The versatile

The authoritative Ayurvedic texts (charak samhita, sushruta samhita, ashtanga hridayam, ashtanga sangraha et al), unanimously declare one medicine as the undisputed champion, ever known to mankind, Triphala. The one remedy for everything!

There is so much text available on this herb, that I do not feel the need to say anything more. So I am just going to share the links I think are good!

The cure for all sorrows

The uses of triphala churna

The Triphala Talisman

 

 

 

Diseases – Part 2

Continued from Diseases – Part 1

Sage Patanjali in his yoga sutra (1:30)  says:
vyâdhi-styâna-sanåaya-pramâdâlasyâvirati-bhrânti-daråanâlabdha-bhûmikatvânavasthitatvâni cittavikæepâste ‘ntarâyâï
vyâdhi = sickness
styâna = apathy
sanåaya = doubt
pramâda = carelessness
âlasya = laziness
avirati = sexual indulgence
bhrânti = false
daråana = vision, perspective
alabdha = failing to attain
bhûmikatva = developmental stages
anavasthitatvâni = inconstancy, instability
citta = consciousness
vikæepâï = distraction, stirring up
te = these
antarâyâï = obstacles

Sickness, apathy, doubt, carelessness, laziness, hedonism, delusion, lack of progress, and inconstancy are all distractions which, by stirring up consciousness, act as barriers to stillness. These are not isolated individual problems tampering the steadfast quality of the citta. Instead, these are all connected and evolve from one to another.

Prevention of disease and thereby distractions, is always better than their respective cures. For a cure, is a process of reverse engineering from analyzing the effect to reach and identify the cause. It is an overhead, it is time consuming, because the effect, may not be a benign one and would steadily or rapidly aggravate whilst the analysis is in progress. Or even if the effect is a benign one, it might not be an irreversible one. Even if it is irreversible, restoring the human body or mind to its original state needs time, this is time required in addition to the time already invested in reaching from the cause to the effect.

Systems like Yoga, pranayam, meditation and others are programmed for nipping the bud of distractions in their early stages. Simple body language techniques reveal,when we think about some event in the past, we tend to look downwards. We access the temporal lobe of the brain. The temporal lobes are involved in the retention of visual memories, processing sensory input, comprehending language, storing new memories, emotion, and deriving meaning.

Similarly a person who is thinking about the future, or the next step of action focuses upwards towards the frontal lobe of the brain. The frontal lobe is associated with reward, attention, short-term memory tasks, planning, and motivation.

Most yoga, meditation and mind control mechanisms are well aware of this natural tendency of the human mind. They are scientific approaches to preventing the mind from wandering and improving concentration.

Research in Ayurveda, goes deeper into analyzing the chemical composition of these lobes and regions of brain at the time of duress, distraction and depression; as well as the chemical composition of the brain in states of ecstasy, happiness, calm and meditation.  Certain Ayurvedic herbs are powerful anti-stress agents and also help induce a sense of well-being and calm.

Having said all that, the benefits of eating full timely meals, avoiding over indulgence, exercising and adequate rest should not be underestimated. They are almost necessary prerequisites for any further developments, physical or mental.

Diseases – part 1

Disease is the final distraction of a human beings life. It is the collaborative expression of physiological and psychological distractions accumulated over a period of time. The process of accumulation of distractions happens wittingly or unwittingly and in most cases, inevitably.
With age, the most powerful organ, the human brain, actually becomes more stronger, contrary to the popular notion. It then becomes more decisive and capable to fight distractions. However, for most of us by the time this empowerment takes place, the accumulation of innumerable distractions attains considerable solidarity, enough to defy most resistance by the human brain, rendering the individual susceptible to diseases.
Today, stress has been termed as the biggest contributor towards diseases. It is very important to understand stress and its nature to be able to work towards successful prevention, reduction or elimination of stress. Stress cannot be isolated as an individual cause. It is a process, like weaving, conflicts of various amplitudes and various types are its threads.

The energy (work done over a period of time, thus inclusive of the time spent) consumed in processing the conflicts, results in its dissipation into various channels, and not into a single original intention. The mental projection of this unavailability of energy for the original cause, is called distraction. Prolonged distraction triggers a counter-measure in the human body. In this attempt the human mind tries to demand back the divided energies back into a single channel, very rapidly, ironically, consuming more energy than planned. The psychological projection of this attempt is called ‘anger’. Anger, only does half the job.  It manages to break the threads, however, it does not  re-channelize the energy back to the mainline. It is a more dissipative mode of energizing.